• Seaspiracy

    This film is available on Netflix. It is well worth watching and demonstrates the appalling situation regarding fish farming and the unsustainable way we treat our oceans. Film is fully available on Netflix.   Seaspiracy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Q5CXN7soQg


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  • Salmon Farming – Exposed Scotland’s Appalling Industry

    This a must read to understand the effect of salmon farming on biodiversity and the coastal ecosystem. Ireland has a similar profile as Scotland with an even more pressing temperature regime at sea which will exacerbate the disease and parasite problems associated with the industry. The document is extensive and well researched and should be studied by all concerned with wild fish and environmental matters.  With its beautiful landscapes and rugged coastline, Scotland is renowned as a wildlife destination. But lurking under coastal waters is a rapidly expanding industry, rife with animal welfare issues and damaging the environment and biodiversity. Known as the King of Fish, with their impressive athletic abilities and epic journey from river to sea and back again, Atlantic salmon are Scotland’s most iconic fish. But these days they are factory farmed in huge numbers where they can migrate no further than the cage walls. Scottish salmon farming has expanded quickly, growing by 41% in the past decade, and the industry has no plans to slow. In 2019 a massive 203,881 tonnes of Atlantic salmon was produced (over 38 million individual fish), but industry growth targets of 300,000-400,000 tonnes annually by 2030, involve a further 47-96% increase in production. Please Read More


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  • The Status of Irish Salmon Stocks in 2020 with Catch Advice for 2021

    Salmon Watch Ireland would like draw your attention to the recently published document from the Technical Expert Group on Salmon. We will answer any questions that you may have or request clarification from TEGOS on aspects that you are concerned with. The links to the reports are listed here: Catch Advice 2021 River Specific Advice The Technical Expert Group on Salmon (TEGOS) advises that in 2021:  48 rivers have an advised harvestable surplus as they are exceeding their conservation limits (CLs).  A further 32 rivers, may be opened on a catch and release only basis, subject to IFI management criteria based on having a high probability of achieving 50% of their conservation limit (CL) or exceeding the management qualifying fry threshold of ≥15 fry (0+) per 5 minute electrofishing (multiple site catchment average).  In addition 64 rivers are (a) failing to meet 50% of their CL or (b) recent data to determine their CL attainment status are lacking. Where there is a lack of data, or where catchment-wide electro-fishing surveys indicate juvenile abundance below the fry threshold, the TEGOS assumes that these rivers are failing to meet CL. There are 16 rivers for which there are significant fisheries on the MSW (spring salmon) component of the stock and a separate assessment is made. Of these:  11 have an advised harvestable surplus as they are exceeding their CL.  5 rivers may be opened on a catch and release-only basis subject to IFI management criteria as they have a high probability of achieving 50% of their CL or exceed the minimum mean fry threshold (≥15 fry) in catchment-wide electro-fishing. There are currently 40 rivers or river tributaries of the 144 salmon rivers assessed in Special Areas of Conservation (SACs) where salmon have a qualifying interest under the EU Habitats Directive. Of these, only 20 are above their CL.


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  • Roadmap Policy – Inland Fisheries Ireland

    A Roadmap Policy Framework has been launched for Ireland’s Inland Fisheries Wednesday, 27th of January 2021: The Board of Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) welcomes Minister Eamon Ryan’s publication of ‘Towards a Policy Framework for Inland Fisheries in Ireland - A Roadmap’. The roadmap forms an important part of the first stage of developing a policy and regulatory framework for the inland fisheries sector.   Francis O’Donnell, CEO of Inland Fisheries Ireland said: ‘We encourage all of our stakeholders to get involved in the process of developing this framework for the future of Ireland’s inland fisheries resource. The roadmap is a significant first step in paving the way forward towards a resource that will be conserved and managed in a sustainable way.’ To read more about the roadmap and how to be involved in the process please visit: https://www.gov.ie/en/publication/17099-towards-a-policy-framework-for-inland-fisheries-in-ireland-a-roadmap/.


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  • Much Improved Grilse Returns – Pose Many Questions

    Salmon Watch Ireland is delighted to see much improved grilse and salmon runs to Irish rivers since late May. This has led to many comments as to the nature of why improved runs are entering Irish rivers. It is probably unwise to speculate as to the reasons at this early stage and a clearer picture may arise when the year ends. However when examining this welcome upsurge we may have to look at many aspects of the salmons journey from its feeding ground to their natal rivers and indeed the journey from Ireland as smolts in the previous year. The migration of smolts to sea in 2019 is an obvious place to start and we must examine the freshwater conditions at this juncture to see if increased survival happened at this juncture. Also of interest must be the oceanic conditions which greeted salmon smolts on their migration and at the post smolt nursery areas in the Norwegian sea.  After their first sea winter salmon have a decision to make related to maturity as to whether they return as grilse or stay a longer period at sea and return as MSW salmon. Have conditions improved at sea and are large scale climatic indices favourable to historical increased salmon survival norms? The simple answer is that  climatic indices seem to be heading towards more favourable conditions which may result in a more favourable temperature regime in the North Atlantic regions where salmon feed. If we are to experience the conditions which normally resulted in abundance then we can assume that bye-catch and predation may only be minor impediments to salmon abundance. However within this situation we may have the impacts of climate change which may affect large scale climate indices in a way which may not follow perceived norms in historical data. Only time will tell. The other reasons that we have encountered relate to bye-catch or directed illegal fishery which may have been reduced substantially by the Covid 19 related reduction in fishery effort and market availability around the North Atlantic. It would seem that this theory has some merits but data regarding the fishery effort must be examined to see if there is merit. A very simple analysis of fishery effort in the Norwegian sea, Icelandic waters and the Faroes during the period from mid March may enlighten the debate. However the capture of such large quantities of adult salmon in previous years may have been difficult to hide. Hopefully this increased trend in salmon stocks continues and that the cause is natural rather than man made. However a number of years in the past have given us false hope notably 2007 but there has been a substantial downward trend from 2008. Increased effort by the illegal fishery both at sea and inland has put enormous pressure on limited protection resources and now more than ever directed information is required from stakeholders by IFI to effectively protect the resource.    


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  • Salmon Watch Ireland – Consultation on Policy Document

    More and Stronger smolts ‘The rational management approach is to redouble efforts to address factors impacting on productivity to ensure that …. salmon rivers…. produce the maximum number of healthy wild salmon smolts’ Background – Salmon stocks are close to crisis point Before reading our Policy Document it might be advisable to review the present state of Atlantic salmon in Ireland. In conjunction with the following paragraphs and the short film you will be able to appreciate the many factors affecting Atlantic salmon and sea trout stocks in Ireland. We would appreciate your views on the Policy document and any ideas you may have to help progress conservation of these iconic fish. It is not an exaggeration to suggest that, in the lifetime of people living today, Ireland’s wild Atlantic salmon could become a curiosity confined, at best, to a small number of rivers.  The species may not become totally extinct (although it could) but there may not be sufficient stock for either commercial or recreational exploitation.  A species that has huge Irish heritage and folklore significance and which, in the past, has had major social, economic and recreational value could to all intents and purposes be lost.  There is an obligation on all of use to do our utmost to prevent that happening in the interests of our own and of future generations.  It will not be an easy task. Read More


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  • Annual Conference Galway 19th Oct 2019- Salmon Watch Ireland

    Please note that this conference will help all stakeholders to understand the concepts involved in Closed and Semi Closed Containment in regard to salmon farming. It is…


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  • Deenish Island – Contradictory and inaccurate records reveal a shocking story

    Deenish Island - The Story Continues Here under text of additional submission sent to the Aquaculture Licence Appeal Board. The submission was also forwarded to the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources and Inland Fisheries Ireland for further comment and investigation. AP1-2019(Site T6/202) Dear Sir, With reference to appeal AP1-2019(Site T6/202) to ALAB by MOWI Ireland, Salmon Watch Ireland would like to submit additional information which might aid ALAB in coming to a decision regarding this matter. Salmon Watch Ireland has successfully appealed the decision by the Marine Institute not to release stocking information regarding the Deenish Island Salmon Farm in County Kerry. The Marine Institute has on the 6th August 2019 released information concerning the stocking of the Deenish Island site. It is apparent that the statement issued to ALAB by MOWI regarding the stocking of the site in 2019 is inaccurate and that anomalies exist in stocking data for 2015. Read More


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  • The Status of Irish Salmon Stocks in 2018 with Catch Advice for 2019

    Look up Scientific Advice for Your River in 2019   The scientific advice for your river is included in the following document. If you are interested in learning how the scientific process works then study this document well. Salmon stocks are low on most rivers with no real prospect of improvement unless oceanic conditions improve. Localised problems may also be affecting your river like excessive predation or salmon farms.  Status of Salmon Stocks in 2018 and Catch Advice 2019 Individual River - Catch Advice


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  • Aquaculture and its effects on wild Atlantic salmon populations.

    This document is a must read for all concerned with negative effects caused by salmon aquaculture on wild salmonids. The International Council for the Exploration of the Seas (ICES) advises that there is substantial and growing evidence that salmon aquaculture activities can affect wild Atlantic salmon, through the impacts of sea lice as well as farm escapees. Both factors can reduce the productivity of wild salmon populations and there is marked temporal and spatial variability in the magnitude of reported effects. This document explains in detail how aquaculture can have a varying degree of effect and demonstrates that time period, biomass and environmental factors can change effect. ICES REPORT


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